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Strategic Intelligence Courses
2481 Intelligence and National Security Policy

An interdisciplinary survey and assessment of the role of the Intelligence Community (IC) in the process of developing and executing U.S. national and homeland security policies. Covered are the nature of intelligence and intelligence processes; the evolution, organization, and responsibilities of the Intelligence Community; relationships between intelligence agencies and key national and homeland security policy makers President, the National Security Council, Cabinet secretaries, and the Congress. Recent case studies illustrate the key processes, concepts, and debates regarding intelligence and its role in protecting American security. A special focus of the course is on Coast Guard Intelligence missions, organization, and functions in the post 9/11 security environment.

Credit Hours: 3
Format: Seminar/Class
Open to non-government majors
Offering: Fall and Spring Semesters
 

2281 Intelligence and Democracy 

Exploration of the missions, organization, and processes of the U.S. Intelligence Community; the major debates about the roles, practices and problems of national intelligence; and the Coast Guard's multi-mission intelligence roles. The course includes an examination of the various functions of intelligence including collection systems (both human and technical), critical analysis, intelligence writing, espionage and counterintelligence, covert action, and the role of intelligence in counterterrorism, trans-national and asymmetric threats.

Credit Hours: 3
Format: Seminar/Class
Open to government majors
Offering: Spring Semester
Prerequisite: 2469 and Secret clearance by time class begins
 

2375 U.S. Intelligence: Collections and Analysis 

The global environment of the past decade raises new questions about American security and vulnerability to global threats. It also focused new attention on the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC), specifically its interactions with policymakers, how it works, and products it generates to support U.S. security decisions and policies.

This course is designed to explore the “how it works” aspect of the IC, most notably the intelligence process with specific emphasis on collection systems (both human and technical) and the critical thinking, analysis, writing and dissemination of finished intelligence analysis with a focus in the areas of transnational asymmetric threats. Finally it provides a look at how intelligence analysis supports policymakers in a democratic society. A special focus of the course is Coast Guard Intelligence and its binary role as part of a law enforcement agency and a member of the U.S. Intelligence Community.

Credit Hours: 3
Format: Seminar/Class
Course is open to all majors
Offering: Fall Semester
Prerequisite: 2269 and 2281 for Government majors/2481 for non-Government majors and Secret clearance by time class begins
 

2487 Directed Studies in Strategic Intelligence 

A semester long directed research project in intelligence studies culminating in the completion of an intelligence assessment or intelligence related research subject.

Credit Hours: 3
Open to all majors
Offering: Fall and Spring Semesters
Prerequisite: Permission of Intel Studies Director
 

Other Courses Taught by Intel Studies Faculty: 

2269 National Security Policy 

Addresses the topic of U.S. national security policy from a historical, as well as contemporary perspective. The course starts with a historical treatment of the topic, beginning with the legislative birth of the National Security Council (NSC) in 1947, and then tracing its subsequent evolution over the past 53 years. This part of the course examines the constitutional, political, and bureaucratic setting that shapes the formation of U.S. national security policy. Upon completing the historical examination of the evolution of the national security structure/organization/policy, the major focus of the remainder of the course is an examination of present-day threats/realities shaping U.S. national security policy. Class time and assignments during this section of the course involve surveying the current international environment, cataloging threats, analyzing current U.S. national security policy in place to address these threats, and then making recommendations to refine policy or perhaps change course altogether.

Credit Hours: 3
Format: Seminar/Class
Offering: Fall
Prerequisites: 2141, 2259 or 2263, 2261 or Instructor approval
 

2467 Global Policy Studies/Introduction to Terrorism 

An introductory seminar on terrorism and counterterrorism with a strong emphasis on understanding the basic principles of terrorist ideology; psychology; and motivation in defining the root causes of terrorism. The ability to recognize the fundamental operating principles and motivation of terrorist organizations, both domestic and international, will enable students to better understand the dynamic political and operational impact of terrorists on society and contribute to an enhanced understanding of U.S. policy related to transnational threats.

Credit Hours: 3
Format: Seminar/Class
Open to all majors
Prerequisites: 2141