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cadet blogs

9/11

(The Cadet Experience, Class of 2017) Permanent link   All Posts
Culp Photo September of 2013 was the first time I laid eyes on Ground Zero. The first major performance for the Academy’s Glee Club was a memorial service at Sherwood Island in Connecticut, just a day or two before 9/11. You could look across the water and see where the Twin Towers used to soar above the horizon, before that terrible day 14 years ago. This particular service honored the 161 Connecticut residents who perished that day. Family members and government officials reflected on the impact of 9/11, and the names of the dead were read aloud. It was one of my favorite performances of the year. It was not a rambunctious party in Germany, a dinner at a yacht club, or the National Anthem at a spirited football game; as fun as those might be, the short-lived emotional effect I feel after singing at those events pales drastically in comparison to the sensations in my heart after the choir performed for that ceremony.

 

9/11 has become more and more important to me in recent years, yet I can’t place my finger on any singular reason why that is. I think it’s a conglomeration of the different realizations that have slowly penetrated my mindset since I reported to the Academy – that there are enemies who want to see the United States crumble; that too many families face a perpetual battle against the grief they feel from the loss of loved ones; that protecting them from further harm is the least we can do as a nation; that my own parents or brothers could be the ones whose names are read aloud at a somber ceremony. The opportunity to be close enough to Ground Zero to have actually visited it twice certainly has helped the trauma of that day come alive to me as well. I will never cease to be grateful for having set foot on the memorial in New York City, and for rendering honors to the World Trade Center as we sailed by on Eagle last year. I only wish those people who died that day could know we were saluting their memory.

 

At the 9/11 Memorial Museum, there is a wall with a quote from Virgil. “No day shall erase you from the memory of time.” After having spent the last few years learning more about 9/11 and what it means to so many people and truly beginning to take its impact to heart, I can say that that quote rings true for me. I think it does for the rest of our nation as well, and the rest of the world. We are a resilient people, and while we still feel the pain of loss, we also see the power of our country and the hope of its citizens.

 

More about Abby.