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cadet blogs

Remarkable Transformation

(The Cadet Experience, Class of 2017) Permanent link   All Posts
Pourmonir Photo I would like to start by saying that the weirdest part of this year is definitely being called ma’am. It is believed that the word ma’am was first used in 1668. In today’s society the definition of the word ma’am is a word used to politely reference a queen, a woman that you do not know, or one that ranks above you in the military or police. So my first thought is that I am not royalty, so this word ma’am should not apply. Then when the fourth class continued to greet me as ma’am, my next thought is that they know my name so clearly this common courtesy should not apply either. That leaves me with only one option. They must be greeting me for the position I hold. My thoughts entering this year were that I no longer had to complete the menial tasks of a fourth class cadet, but that my ranking among the corps of cadets had not really shifted. This fallacy was quickly proven false, as I entered the year as Ms. Pourmonir. This sign of respect is used throughout every branch of the military. It still baffled me that one year could change so much. Not only did I become a third class cadet, but I now have responsibility. Not the fourth class kind that requires taking out the trash, but the kind that involves being a role model for those around me and setting standards for others to follow.

 

This school year came with a lot of changes, but the biggest for me was this. Being a role model and having the chance to change someone’s life. Helping them through what some believe to be the hardest year for cadets at the United States Coast Guard Academy. I have two fourth class cadets that I share the responsibility of training and developing. I am in a place now where I can learn the fundamentals of leadership, through experience rather than in a classroom with a whiteboard. This leadership experience transforms each cadet into someone who will one day be leading the men and women of the United States Coast Guard. I am honored to have this opportunity, and wish everyone was able to experience the same remarkable transformation that we learn here at the Academy.

 

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