Skip Navigation Links
APPLY | BEARS DEN LOGIN | REQUEST INFORMATION | ESPAÑOL | VIRTUAL TOUR | SEARCH
FacebookFlickrTwitterYou Tube
CADET BLOGS
<< September 2017 >>
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
          1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30

cadet blogs

Coastal Sail

(The Cadet Experience, Class of 2019) Permanent link
Friedman Photo 2/c summer is a big transition for cadets here at the Academy. It’s when you transition from a follower to a leader and go through different training programs to help you discover your leadership style and ultimately develop a leadership philosophy. One of the highlights of 2/c summer is the Coast Sail Training Program.

 

The Academy has 44-foot leadership sailboats that our awesome alumni bought for us to use. Seven or eight cadets under the supervision of a safety officer will take the sail boat out for two weeks and sail around to some of the best ports in New England like Martha’s Vineyard, Nantucket, Block Island, and more. It’s not a vacation though. There are jobs on the boat that everyone will rotate through as well as permanent collateral. My collateral was commissary officer so I was in charge of making sure we had enough food, water, and making a meal plan for the sail. The rotating jobs vary from deck hand, cook, navigator, etc.

 

The most notable day is the day you are watch captain. As watch captain, you are in charge of the boat for the day. You need to work with your navigator to make sure you get to where you need to be because the safety officer is just that, a safety officer. They only step in if they feel a situation is going to become unsafe, otherwise they’ll let you sail in the wrong direction or make other mistakes so you understand what it feels like to be in charge and have everyone look to you if things go wrong.

 

On my watch captain day, we hit a storm coming out of Martha’s Vineyard. We had about 3-foot seas and winds sustaining 15 knots, with gusts up to 20, which is pretty notable on a 44-foot sail boat. On top of that, our sister ship had a steering casualty so we had to divert course and quickly prepare to pull into a new port. It gives you the “oh no” moment when all of your classmates look at you for a decision on what to do next, but that’s the point. It puts you in the spot where you have to make a quick decision with a safety officer who is there to stop things when they can potentially become dangerous. This is so when, not if, you are put in a stressful situation later in your Coast Guard career that it’s not unfamiliar and you’re used to making decisions under pressure. It was a stressful day but was an experience I learned a lot and grew a lot from.

 

If you have any questions feel free to email me Jill.M.Friedman@uscga.edu.

 

More about Jill.

 

Jump In! The Water’s Fine!

(Athletics, Class of 2018, Civil Engineering) Permanent link
Kokomoor Photo Sometimes it is hard to just jump right in. Especially in an institution where the options in front of you are so expansive and offer such different opportunities, it is easy to find oneself overwhelmed and timid. Yet, if I have learned anything at this Academy, it is that the more you throw yourself out into the chaos, the more you will get out of your cadet career.

 

As a 1/c cadet and Civil Engineer major starting my fourth and final year at the Academy, I am finding myself reflecting on everything that I have taken part in and everything that has made me the person that I am today. I am a swimmer for the Women’s Swimming and Diving Team and a Captain for the 2017-2018 season. Swimming has truly shaped the type of cadet that I have become. I have developed a stronger work ethic and grown as a teammate and more importantly, as a shipmate.

 

Swimming for me is a release. It allows me to temporarily escape the mechanics of life in Chase Hall and share in something wonderful with people who love my sport just as much as I do. Everyone here has to have that one thing; an outlet to explore the possibilities afforded to us as cadets at one of the greatest military institutes in the world. For others it is band, rugby, Glee, or if you want to throw a few punches it’s boxing! But for everyone there is a common element: you have to just jump in! You have to get involved and you can never be scared to try something new and fail a few times before finding your bearing.

 

More about Jacklyn.

 

Summer 2017: Internship in Alaska

(Academics, Class of 2018, Civil Engineering) Permanent link
Kimura Photo Internships at the Academy are definitely possible and so rewarding. Every major offers summer internships to cadets entering their senior year. These range from working at the NSA, the White House, U.S. Coast Guard bases, NOAA, Army Corps of Engineers, and many others!

 

I spent my summer internship at the Base Kodiak, Alaska working with the facilities engineering (FE) department. I am a civil major, which is a highly needed field in the Coast Guard. At FE, the floor is composed of a CDR, LCDR, LT, an information technician, mechanical technicians, electrical technician, environmental technicians, and various other contracting officer representatives. The five-week experience allowed me to see and contribute to actual Coast Guard projects. For example, the flight decks were being repaved and we regularly inspected the hangars to prioritize upcoming projects. On the other hand, Base Kodiak has a water treatment facility on site, so monitoring the water quality to the houses fell on the environmental department. In addition, there were building projects being planned, such as replacing WWII era houses or remodeling the Child Development Center’s playground.

 

I was always busy doing something, whether it was FE work, shadowing other technicians there, exploring Kodiak Island, or meeting the junior officers (recent Academy graduates) nearby. While at the internship, I stayed at the barracks on base and borrowed my LT’s truck to get around. Firstie summer has by far been my favorite summer training experience because of the independence I was given to drive to work on my own, cook for myself, plan hikes after work or camp on the weekends.

 

More about Amy.

 

New Year, New Outlook

(Just for Fun, The Cadet Experience, Class of 2020) Permanent link
Hill PhotoSo, this summer was rewarding – I had the chance to experience my favorite things: sun, shipmates, and the South! I learned SO much on USCGC Eagle and how to deal with challenges and time stresses (even more). And I didn’t get seasick—yay! I also made so many new friends in the Class of 2020 and the Class of 2018. After Eagle, I ventured down to Station Charleston, South Carolina for six weeks where I made connections with fellow Coast Guardsmen and learned about the enlisted side of things.

 

Currently, I am trying to adjust to my new role as a 3/c by learning how to be a mentor/leader for my 4/c cadets who, I am proud to say, are very exceptional young men and women. I am excited for these extra responsibilities and no more 0800 classes!! Things were stressful during Cadet Administrative Processing (CAP) week just because we were all adjusting and preparing for the Formal Room and Wing inspection but, like they somehow always do, all our resources came together and we ended up having a beautiful, super-clean Golf Company wing area.

 

Gotta teach those 4/c how to get to bed on time though!

 

Ready to use my new privilege of wearing khakis and letting my hair down on liberty.

 

I really love my great girlfriends on the cheer team and in my Bible study! My confidence has skyrocketed since last year and knowing all the teachers and the different study/organization methods that work for me have improved my quality of life here at the CGA (not to mention the fact that I don’t have to square anymore).

 

I genuinely have a home-away-from-home and love my new family here.

 

Thanks for reading!

 

Be the reason someone smiles today :)

 

3/c Kelly Hill

 

More about Kelly.

 

Rolling on the River

(Academics, Just for Fun, Class of 2020) Permanent link
Farlow Photo The academic year is rolling along here on the Thames in New London and I could not be more excited to be a third class cadet. It was great to return to the Academy from leave and see my friends and teammates, some of whom I had not seen in over three months. Last time my class walked the halls together we wore green shields on our uniforms and bore no stripe on our shoulder boards. Now we have returned wearing red shields and having earned a single diagonal stripe. This year will bring so many new adventures, new lessons, new friends, and perhaps most importantly the privilege to look at my food again. Third class year is a transition out of followership and into role-modeling. For my class, we will be setting an example for fourth class, holding ourselves accountable, and finishing out our core classes.

 

At the end of fourth class year, cadets are shuffled and moved to new companies where they will remain for the duration of the next three years. I was an Alfa fourth class and was placed in Charlie for the next three. I am interested to learn about Charlie’s role in the corps and what I can do to be a part of it as a third class. I am also eager to help fourth class get through this year because although it is tough, it is worth it, but that can be difficult to see while you’re experiencing it.

 

I am also excited to start taking major-specific classes and really begin to understand the Operations Research major. This semester I am taking two math classes, a computer language class, American Government, Rescue Swimming, Organizational Behavior and Leadership, and Spanish. I am really looking forward to the computer language and math classes. Outside of class I am part of the women’s rugby team this season as well as Cadets Against Sexual Assault, Spectrum Council and Women’s Leadership Council.

 

Go 3/c year and Go Bears!

 

More about Francesca.

 

100 Days of Summer

(Just for Fun, The Cadet Experience, Class of 2019) Permanent link
Silliman Photo Fun fact! The 14 weeks that are set aside for summer training here at the Academy works out to be exactly 100 days.

 

The first two weeks of the summer went by in no time. We started with 100th Week when they brought up the Cape May Company Commanders who run the enlisted boot camp to teach us basically how to be cadre. It started out with them just treating us like enlisted recruits, but became more and more about us assimilating into the role of cadre. The rest of the week included classroom leadership training and a trip to Stones Ranch where we did team-building exercises on their challenge course. The next week was largely helping out with graduation and getting to see the Commander-in-Chief give a speech at commencement right in front of me. After the Class of 2017 left, the campus fell dead silent and I had two days to practice navigation skills out on the T-boats.

 

Then I had three weeks of leave, the bulk of which was spent at home helping my dad fix up our sailboat. I also went hiking in New Hampshire for two days with a friend from home. Additionally, I went to Vail, Colorado to hang out with a friend working at a golf course and we had four days of just straight hiking and playing golf.

 

Returning to the Academy, I had a week of shooting to qualify in pistol, where I just barely passed by getting the necessary target score on the last day. Then we had prep week before the swabs arrived when we set up their rooms and prepared down at Jacob’s Rock for waterfront cadre.

 

The next three weeks I was entrusted with the awesome responsibility of training 36 new members of the Coast Guard and one member of Georgia’s armed forces as well as interacting with every member of the Class of 2021 down on the waterfront. I had to work with my classmates in ways different from any way I had worked with them before. It started out a lot of fun, but it got pretty tiring by the end, and we really had to work to keep up the intensity of the training for the swabs.

 

After cadre, I went down to Mobile, Alabama for a week of training called the Cadet Aviation Training Program. I got to go up in a Jayhawk and even got hoisted by a rescue swimmer.

 

I probably went home for five different weekends during the summer since I live so close to hang out with friends, go sailing, and even take another hiking trip up to New Hampshire.

 

Having grown up on Cape Cod, the Coastal Sail Training Program was a really cool way to see home. Venturing all over New England like that was awesome, and I was even able to host 26 of my friends at my house for dinner. The summer ended back in the classroom with the Rules of the Road exam.

 

So, there it is. 100 days of summer, which is one more for the books and I am looking now to starting the school year strong.

 

More about Derek.

 

From USCGC Legare Until Now

(The Cadet Experience, Life as a Junior Officer, Class of 2018) Permanent link
Chang PhotoA snippet from the beginning:

 

Well, it’s been a week since I’ve arrived on the USCGC Legare and I’ve learned some things about what life will be like as a brand-new ensign. First, you’re pretty much as lost as the new non-rate on board and the learning curve is a straight shot upward. You need to get your bearings quickly, but apparently being underway is a lot better than being in port. (I think I can attest to that, since there’s not much to do after the workday is done.) There are also a bunch of Academy grads in the area, including a few of my former cadre. It just goes to show that you never fully escape it. But all that aside, I’m excited to see what I can do here and what will come.

 

A snippet from the end:

 

I had my doubts about coming aboard the Legare. I was a bit skeptical about going on any platform smaller than a 378’ and was depressed by the thought of being in Portsmouth, Virginia. Upon arriving, my skepticism died down a little, but not by much (we were still in Virginia and suffered some technical difficulties). However, by the end of six weeks, I can say that I wouldn’t have traded my experience on Legare for anything else in the fleet.

 

I’ve learned so much from the Legare crew. It always amazes me how a short time underway can really make you bond with the people around you, and it was bittersweet leaving the boat. I think the reason why I took away so much from this assignment is because the lessons weren’t always about being a good officer. It comes from the little things, such as checking on the lookouts outside or telling someone they’re appreciated. Everywhere you go, there are so many different personalities, and when all those characters are put on a confined platform for an entire patrol, it gets interesting. Basically, you don’t need to remember every little detail of being a good officer; just be a good person and the rest will follow.

 

More about Olivia.

 

My San Francisco Summer

(The Cadet Experience, Class of 2018, Civil Engineering) Permanent link
Kokomoor Photo My all-expenses-paid trip to San Francisco for 11 weeks this summer had me designing civil engineering solutions, exploring Alcatraz Island, jumping into Damage Control Drills onboard a National Security Cutter, and flying a helicopter around the Bay Bridge. And best of all, I did it all for the Coast Guard.

 

My summer was a phenomenal experience. I started at a civil engineering internship in California designing drainage solutions for the Coast Guard Training Center Petaluma by day and exploring northern California by night! After five weeks of hard, yet rewarding, work I co-presented design solutions that are now being submitted for the 2018 fiscal year plan! I also made visits to a number of Coast Guard Units including the Civil Engineering Unit in Oakland, team members from which took me and my cadet counterpart to climb the Alcatraz lighthouse on official business. We next traveled to the CGC Waesche in Alameda, California where we quickly assimilated to shipboard life. We took part in the everyday routines and had the unique opportunity to visit Air Station San Francisco, Station San Francisco, Sector San Francisco, and Maritime Intelligence Fusion Center Pacific (MIFC PAC). My summer encompassed a large portion of the Coast Guard, both operationally and within the support realm, allowing me to better understand the organization and the hard career decisions I will have before me as a junior officer.

 

As a native New Englander, the West Coast really caught me off guard, but it was amazing to immerse myself in the culture and attitude of the area and observe how the Coast Guard is able to expertly assimilate into an environment and thrive with outstanding community support. My San Francisco summer taught me so much about the Coast Guard, but most importantly, it taught me that there is so much more to learn. This service has so much to offer and I have not yet scratched the surface!

 

More about Jacklyn.