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cadet blogs

The Eagle’s “Barque” is Worse Than It’s Bite

(Overcoming Challenges, The Cadet Experience, Class of 2019) Permanent link
King PhotoEagle was awesome. It really was. Before going, I was worried that it was going to be miserable. We were sailing across the North Atlantic, one of the wildest routes for weather. I’m glad I was wrong. I had so much fun, and did so many things, that it was one of the best adventures of my life. I’d like to share my three favorite experiences.

 

1. The Ocean Itself – The ocean is big, very big; that’s what I’ve learned. There were weeks when we didn’t see any sign of another boat. It was simply amazing feeling so small. We saw pods of dolphins, HUGE great white sharks, and a basking shark. It felt like the sea had no end. At night, it was even better—dolphins swimming in water florescent from the algae and the sky was pure stars. We saw sunrise at 3 in the morning and sunsets at 10 at night. It was very humbling.

 

2. Making Friends – I got to meet so many of my classmates on Eagle. The way Eagle is designed is that you are given opportunities to interact with people you haven’t met in other situations. I sanded, scrubbed, mess-cooked, cleaned, did damage control, shot stars, and checked oil levels with so many new people and made a lot of friends. Even when we were doing some of the less desirable jobs, it was worth it because of the team bonding.

 

3. Climbing the Royals – This had to be my absolute favorite part of the summer. The royals are one of the highest parts of the mast. Climbing them is one of the biggest goals many of the cadets have. To do so is no small task—they are 146 feet above the deck. I was fortunate to climb them six times. The first time was by far the scariest—there was an oncoming squall, the water was rough with wind, and to top it off, it was in the dark. I was so afraid, but somehow found the courage to keep going. My division was incredibly supportive, and together, we finished the job together. After that first time, I couldn’t get enough of climbing. I was able to climb in Ireland, England, and a few more times on the open ocean. I wouldn’t trade that experience for anything.

 

More about Deborah.