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cadet blogs

Autumn in New England

(Just for Fun, The Cadet Experience, Class of 2017) Permanent link
Cannon Photo Well, it's the first day of fall in New London, Connecticut. I am going to miss the warm weather, summer nights, days at the lake, and so on and so forth. But despite not being the biggest fan of colder weather, I honestly have high hopes for this upcoming autumn/winter. You might ask, "But Colton, how in the world could you find enjoyment of the bitter New England cold where you aren't right down the road from the nearest Chick-Fil-A or Waffle House?" While that is definitely a valid question, there are plenty of upsides to the changing of seasons (despite being so far from Georgia). Autumn means a couple of things: bonfires, camping, corn mazes, pumpkin patches, THANKSGIVING, state fairs (I'll take a fried order of everything you have, please), college football games (WDE), dressing more formal is considered casual...and that is just off the top of my head. Probably one of the sweetest parts of the fall up here is a large-scale obstacle course I go to in Vermont each year. Not only is it eight to ten miles of variations of crawling, running, pull ups, and carrying heavy objects, but the changing color of the trees in the Vermont mountains is unbelievable. I guess you could say things are getting pretty serious...

 

The summer was pretty incredible though, don't get me wrong. Whether it was sailing around New England and spending the fourth of July in Nantucket (or was it Martha's Vineyard?), or training incoming swabs (easily the best part of my Academy experience so far), it was a time of non-stop adventure. I will say though that training the swabs with Lyme Disease was an interesting experience to say the least. If I were to yell at any point, I would be completely out of energy for the rest of the day. Despite that, it may have been a blessing in disguise. Since I was unable to yell and scream nonsense like cadre tend to resort to, I was forced to actually use leadership lessons and be one of the more approachable cadre when it came to classroom time with the swabs. I may have not instilled the fear of God in them, but I do believe that taking this alternative approach allowed me to truly gain respect from many of my swabs (now freshmen!!!), and we are all able to have healthy yet professional relationships to this day. I am thankful for all of the unforgettable experiences in my journey as a cadet so far, and anticipate the many more to come.

 

Go Bears Baseball!
Colton

 

More about Colton.

 

A First Class Fall

(Academics, Overcoming Challenges, Class of 2016) Permanent link
Daghir Photo Hello from the Coast Guard Academy! Sorry that I haven’t written in a while but it has been a crazy semester so far. As a 1/c cadet, I am expected to lead a division and to be a role model to the cadets in my company and in the corps. I love being able to motivate underclassmen, and to be that firstie that we all dreamed to be for the past three years. As a 1/c, we are expected to go to about a million medical examinations (more if you are going to apply to flight school) as well as sign up for our pictures so I can already see that with all of this, the semester will likely fly by. School has been pretty fun thus far; I am taking a lot of classes that really interest me. I enrolled in National Security Policy, which is offered by the Humanities department and I am the only non-Gov major in the class. It is a really cool class; I highly recommend it because it involves relevant discussions of current events and how they pertain to our national interest. I love it. Additionally, I am taking a few oceanography classes that get me very excited about graduate school possibilities and research. Lastly, I am taking Nautical Science and the class was changed for the first time to give the students the opportunity to get their 100 ton masters license. This is great because it can be used outside of the Coast Guard as a civilian.

 

While classes are good, I should mention that the Academy is not all fun and games. As cadets, we are expected to uphold the core values and to be respectful and responsible at all times. People occasionally get into trouble and, unfortunately, I have attended two masts in the past week. A mast is a way to punish cadets when they have violated the regulations that we are held to at all times. What happens is a cadet will come before the Commandant of Cadets or the Assistant Commandant and will stand at attention to be read their rights. A trial or sorts is held to determine if he or she has committed the offense. At the end, the cadet is either seen to commit the offense or not, and if found guilty, then he or she will be awarded a punishment of restriction, marching tours and demerits. Masts are scary but they are a good reminder that we go to a military academy, and that we must act like officers all the time. It is a lot to digest but I think that as a firstie going into the fleet, I have to say that I can see the importance of us learning what we need to, in the broad spectrum from academics to social skills, to conduct.

 

My life at school has been hectic but the weather has been beautiful. This time of year is my absolute favorite. I am crazy excited to start our fall lacrosse season. As a captain this year, I am thrilled to have another opportunity to take on some new responsibility and to help make this season great.